Confetti

Italy CreativeUncategorizedConfetti

May

5

May 5 , 2013 | Posted by Italy Creative |

Confetti

The confetti were not just for ceremonial use, they were real sweetmeats made of candied fruits, or, as we learn from a manuscript of 1504, with almonds, dried fruits, aromatic seeds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, or cinnamon, covered with a hard coating of sugar.  And they were habitually served not only at wedding banquets, but also at many important meals.

The introduction of sugarcane into European kitchens in the XVth century marked the beginning of the modern era for confetti.

Colors: white for weddings, silver for twenty-fifth anniversaries, sky-blue or pink for christenings, red for graduations, green for engagements.

Shapes: smooth, textured, spherical, oval, teardrop, heart-shaped.

Centers of: almonds, hazelnuts, anise seeds, cinnamon sticks, rosolio (a sweet old-fashioned liquor made of Tangerines), coffee beans, peanuts, pistachios, marzipan, chocolate.

The origin of confetti goes back to the ancient Romans, who celebrated births and marriages with the distant ancestors of today’s confetti and, until the Renaissance, as other sweets, were made with honey.  The first literary attestation of confetti in Boccaccio’s Decameron in the 1350’s.  The earliest testimonies of the high status and near-ritual use of confetti come from the late middle age and Renaissance.  In 1487, according to chronicles of the period, more than two hundred and sixty pounds of confetti were consumed at the banquet held the day after the wedding of Lucrezia Borgi and Alfonso D’Este, son of Ercole I, Duke of Ferrara.

The origin of confetti goes back to the ancient Romans, who celebrated births and marriages with the distant ancestors of today’s confetti and, until the Renaissance, as other sweets, were made with honey.  The first literary attestation of confetti in Boccaccio’s Decameron in the 1350’s.  The earliest testimonies of the high status and near-ritual use of confetti come from the late middle age and Renaissance.  In 1487, according to chronicles of the period, more than two hundred and sixty pounds of confetti were consumed at the banquet held the day after the wedding of Lucrezia Borgi and Alfonso D’Este, son of Ercole I, Duke of Ferrara.

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